Moo, a scholar who holds to the so-called 'old perspective' or traditional Protestant perspective on Paul brings over a decade of research and thoughtful analysis to the NIV text. Second Edition. Douglas J. Moo (born March 15, 1950) is a New Testament scholar who, after teaching for more than twenty years at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Illinois, has served as Blanchard Professor of New Testament at the Wheaton College Graduate School since 2000. seminar at … Douglas Moo — The Epistle to the Romans (New International Commentary on the New Testament, 1996). This course was recorded during a D.Min. Douglas Moo's work on the Epistle to the Romans is part of The New International Commentary on the New Testament. 1. The Romans course, taught by Douglas Moo, brings the meaning of Paul's great letter into the twenty-first century. Pauline studies have blossomed in the last twenty years since the first edition was published. Douglas Moo has definitely risen as a top scholar on Romans. He also is persuaded by the contrasts mentioned under the first argument. Romans [NIVAC] by leading Pauline scholar Douglas J. Moo is his first of two major commentaries on this preeminent Pauline epistle. Far from the excursus that some have found in these chapters, scholars such as Krister Stendahl think that the central theme of Romans is to be found here: the history of salvation and of the two peoples, Jews and Gentiles, within this history. This volume takes on Paul’s letter to the Romans, which has been called “the quintessence and perfection of saving doctrine.” In this volume respected New Testament scholar Douglas J. Moo provides a superb study of Paul's letter to the Roman Christians and restates the enduring message of Romans for Christians today. Then, after a bit of an excursus in 9:30–10:21, he reminds us that God is continuing to manifest his grace to Israel by calling Jews to be saved (11:1–10). I've read to one extent or another three of his commentaries on Romans. Link to Eerdmans Douglas Moo’s 1996 commentary on Romans quickly became a standard reference on Paul’s longest and most important letter.

NICNT; Grand Rapids, Mich.: Eerdmans, 2018. clvi+1027 pp. See also D. A. Carson, who writes on Rom. In addition to this volume, the following are five of the most helpful commentaries on the book of Romans. Moo, a scholar who holds to the so-called 'old perspective' or traditional Protestant perspective on Paul brings over a decade of research and thoughtful analysis to the NIV text. 1:18—3:20: “Disputants are unlikely to agree on the solution to a problem if they cannot agree on the nature of the problem.” 442-451) argues that Paul presents his experience as a representative Jewish unbeliever under the law to show that the law is impotent to save anyone from their sin, thus reinforcing the argument of 7:1-13. Douglas J. Moo, The Epistle to the Romans (NICNT; Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996), 92. Douglas Moo (The Epistle to the Romans [Eerdmans], pp. His 1,000 page tome has replaced the two volume edition previously authored by John Murray. Romans 9-11 was the next section to take center stage in the debate. This volume takes on Paul’s letter to the Romans, which has been called “the quintessence and perfection of saving doctrine.” In this volume respected New Testament scholar Douglas J. Moo provides a superb study of Paul's letter to the Roman Christians and restates the enduring message of Romans for Christians today.

Finally, he holds out hope for a greater bestowal of grace on Israel in … In 9:6–29, Paul uses the Old Testament itself to define the promise. ; Hb. Moo, Douglas J. Romans. Douglas Moo’s commentary on Romans is judged by many to be the best all around evangelical commentary on this epistle.

Clearly, in order for this statement to make any sense, Paul must be using the word "Israel" in two different senses - and I believe it is the same two senses in which he uses the word "Israel" in the context surrounding Romans 11:26.